Why every job search should be a mobile job search.

Smartphone cartoon

This is a guest post by Joe Linford of Broadband Genie. If you’d also like to guest post here on JobMob, follow these guest post guidelines.

If you don’t have a smartphone like the iPhone 4S to job search with, here’s what you’re missing out on:

Internet access

Imagine this: you’re waiting for a job interview when a tough question pops into your head and you start to worry about not having a good reply.

In the past, you would have had to hope that it wouldn’t come up in the ensuing interview.

But now, you can quickly go on Twitter and tweet the question or better yet, direct message a few of your favorite job search experts and likely get a reply before going into the interview.

How cool is that?

You could also research an interviewer if you didn’t have their name earlier, check the latest news about the hiring company or its industry, and the list goes on.

Memory to go

Smartphones have plenty of room to store files of any type, just like a USB drive.

Use the space to carry around versions of your CV – different file formats, different languages, whatever might be useful – and samples of your work.

Smartphone apps

Have you seen The Longest List of iPhone Job Search Apps Ever or my compilation of 300+ Android Job Search Apps?

There are apps to teach you about job search, apps to organize your job search, apps to find job listings and so much more.

There are apps to display your work samples whether audio/video/photo/text, and there are apps to share those samples with your interviewer (or anyone else) instead of needing to download the files directly to your interviewer’s computer through a cable connection.

And there are apps that really let you take advantage of the smartphone’s hardware, such as for the…

GPS

It’s not unusual to be late to an interview because you couldn’t find the place.

However, between GPS, mapping apps and ShowMyStreet.com, you really have no excuse for this to happen anymore.

Microphone

Record your interviews, so you can play them back later and analyze how you did. Or use a digital dictaphone app to capture ideas before you forget them.

Camera

Take pictures of:

  • your work, for your work portfolio
  • QR codes, then use a QR decoder app to quickly visit the website of the corresponding job listing, job fair, or other
  • interview locations, so you can easily recognize the place when you return
  • people who interviewed you
  • contacts you make at local networking events

Record video of:

  • yourself, doing what you do (where relevant, e.g. musician, artist, actor, etc.)
  • yourself, practicing job interviews
  • yourself, being interviewed (but ask the interviewer if it’s ok first, and whatever you do, don’t let it become a distraction)

Fishing for comments

At what point on your job search were you happiest to have a smartphone? Tell us in the comments.

NEXT, READ 41 Tips for Using Your Cellphone to Find Jobs.

About the author

Joe Linford writes on behalf of consumer advice and comparison website Broadband Genie. They list the best broadband, mobile broadband and smartphone offers in one place and also provide help guides, news and views on everything Internet-related.

Subscribe to JobMob via RSS or email and follow me on Twitter for more ideas on using technology to improve your job search.


--Jacob Share