😕 Depressed On Your Job Search? Take This Quick Test

Use this simple self-test to find out if your job search is keeping you down more than it should.

Are You Depressed On Your Job Search Take The Test

Photo Credit: JD Hancock

 

The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9 for short) was developed by Pfizer and “is used as a screening and diagnostic tool for mental health disorders of depression, anxiety, alcohol, eating, and somatoform,” according to Wikipedia.

While some self-tests are just gimmicks, a 2006 study to “assess the validity of the Patient Health Questionnaire depression module” had results that “support the construct validity of the PHQ depression scale, which seems to be a useful tool to recognize not only major depression but also sub-threshold depressive disorder in the general population.”

In other words, the PHQ-9 is useful enough that doctors will administer it to potential patients, yet simple enough that you can test yourself.

depression test tweet

While I'm not a doctor and this test shouldn't be considered as medical advice, take it here below to judge whether you should talk to a doctor or otherwise get help for a state of mind that's making your job search harder than it needs to be.

But before you take it-

How long have you felt job search depressed?


 

Free bonus: Download The Job Search Depression Report which contains insights and resources on how to manage if you're too depressed to look for work.

The Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9)

As you do the test, choose the best answer to each question and note the corresponding number of points, which you can add up as you go or at the end.

Over the past 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems?

1. Little interest or pleasure in doing things

Not at all: 0 points

Several days: 1 point

More than half the days: 2 points

Nearly every day: 3 points

2. Feeling down, depressed or hopeless

Not at all: 0 points

Several days: 1 point

More than half the days: 2 points

Nearly every day: 3 points

3. Trouble falling asleep, staying asleep, or sleeping too much

Not at all: 0 points

Several days: 1 point

More than half the days: 2 points

Nearly every day: 3 points

4. Feeling tired or having little energy

Not at all: 0 points

Several days: 1 point

More than half the days: 2 points

Nearly every day: 3 points

5. Poor appetite or overeating

Not at all: 0 points

Several days: 1 point

More than half the days: 2 points

Nearly every day: 3 points

6. Feeling bad about yourself – or that you're a failure or have let yourself or your family down

Not at all: 0 points

Several days: 1 point

More than half the days: 2 points

Nearly every day: 3 points

7. Trouble concentrating on things, such as reading the newspaper or watching television

Not at all: 0 points

Several days: 1 point

More than half the days: 2 points

Nearly every day: 3 points

8. Moving or speaking so slowly that other people could have noticed. Or, the opposite – being so fidgety or restless that you have been moving around a lot more than usual

Not at all: 0 points

Several days: 1 point

More than half the days: 2 points

Nearly every day: 3 points

9. Thoughts that you would be better off dead or of hurting yourself in some way

Not at all: 0 points

Several days: 1 point

More than half the days: 2 points

Nearly every day: 3 points

Calculating your score

Once you complete the test, now add up all the points from your answers to calculate a final score. If you tally more than 27 points, you've either miscalculated or you recorded multiple answers for at least one question.

Before checking your results, please keep in mind again that I'm not a doctor, and that the following conclusions aren't medical advice, they're simplifications of what I've seen from scientific sources.

0-4 points total

Minimal depression, if any. Nothing to worry about.

5-9 points

Mild depression. Re-test yourself in another two weeks. If the situation hasn't improved, talk to a doctor or therapist.

10-14 points

You might be moderately depressed. Talk to a doctor.

15 points or more

Please see a doctor as soon as possible, you need help and I want you to get it. While you might think to ask your general practitioner or family doctor first, a psychiatrist is best equipped to diagnose people who might be depressed and decide on the correct treatment for what is actually a fairly complex health issue.

Job search is hard enough without the burden of depression, and the accompanying lack of self-confidence is hampering you more than you realize. Employers rarely make pity hires, and you don't need to be one.

Question of the article

What do you find is most depressing about your current job search? Tell us in the comments. Use a fake name, if you feel the need to go anonymous.

Free Bonus

Download The Job Search Depression Report if you're getting depressed because you can't find a job. It contains:

  • 15 Causes of Job Search Depression and How To Prevent It
  • 13 Signs of Job Search Depression
  • Unsure About The Signs? Take The Test
  • 9 Ways To Deal With Job Search Depression

Click the image below to get access to The Job Search Depression Report:

The Job Search Depression Report - wide download button

JobMob Insiders can get this free bonus and other exclusive content in the JobMob Insider Bonuses area. Join now, it's free!

Subscribe to JobMob via email and follow me on Twitter for more help job hunting while depressed.

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